COLORADO SPRINGS HOST THE ULTIMATE TROPICS MUSEUM

Gary Diskin - Dec 7, 2009
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Great lures in tourism have often proved to be either nature or museums. The May Natural History Museum of the Tropics manages to combine these features. It is slowly becoming the most famous insect museum on the planet.

 

 

With over 100,000 invertebrates to explore, it is not surprising that the residents of Colorado Springs are particularly proud of the local May Natural History Museum of the Tropics. However, only 8000 tend to be on display at one time. Indeed, how much is it possible to see in one day?

 

The invertebrates on display are regularly changed to prevent visitors from coming only once. The museum started in 1929, mostly through the efforts of James and John May, a team of enthusiastic father and son. Carrying their knowledge and exhibits through Canada and the USA, the dream has managed to survive until today.

 

Many schools and colleges use the museum to educate their pupils and students about a world the average person knows so little about. The majority of visitors tend to focus on two things: the dangerous insects and the big ones. Amongst 8000 insects, one is sure to find something to fit into these categories.

 

An example of an insect, which may cause specific interest, is the stick insect of New Guinea. At 17 inches long, it certainly fits into the “size” category, with one twist. Unless this particular insect moves, one cannot see it. Belonging to the dangerous category are a number of members of the museum. Besides the purple tarantulas of Peru, the museum proudly homes the 9-inch scorpion of the Congo. Just the thought that something so small is capable of causing so much damage is bound to turn a few heads. Even if insects of the tropics don’t happen to be your biggest hobby, the pure variety of this museum still makes a visit worthwhile.

 

 

 

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Comments

  1. I want to say a huge thank you to the staff for reading my comment last week and acting upon it by writing about this specific museum.

    Wishing all of you the happiest of holiday seasons!

    Floy Kennedy


    (USA)

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