TO CLIMB OR NOT TO CLIMB? THE PROBLEM WITH THE AUSTRALIAN SACRED ROCK

Richard Moor - Jul 27, 2009
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An Australian park authority along with Aboriginals wants to forbid tourists to climb Ayers Rock now known as Uluru. This move could severely affect local tourism, which is why local government opposes this decision. Ultimate decision lies with the federal government.  A famous Australian tourism attraction, the Uluru, also known as Ayers Rock, may become much less attractive for tourists. The Uluru National Park authorities want to ban climbing the rock. They argue there are cultural, environmental as well as safety reasons for the ban.Uluru is a 348-meter high sandstone rock formation in the southern part of the Northern Territory. The rock is a sacred place for the Aboriginals and it has an important role in their mythology. Ever since the rock was given back to them in 1985, they want the tourists to be banned from climbing it. They argue that mosques, cathedrals and other temples are not climbed therefore their rock deserves the same amount of respect. Currently, there is a sign at the base of the rock, asking tourist not to climb Uluru. Nevertheless, if the federal government agrees to ban the climbing it could severely affect local tourism sector. For that reason the government of the Northern Territory opposes the ban. Currently Uluru or Ayers Rock attracts some 350,000 tourists a year.The other reason for the ban is that it is not entirely safe to climb the rock. So far, some 30 tourists died when they tried to climb it. As a part of deterring strategy, a visitor can get details about these deaths at the base of Uluru. Last but not leas there is the lack of toilets on the sacred rock. Problems resulting for this deficiency are more than obvious.  Related:The Precious Uluru – Australia’s Unique Wonder 

Comments

  1. I have never been to Uluru but don't quite understand people who knowing the importance of the place to the aboriginals would just go and step on their beliefs. It's totaly disrespectful.
    Would you climb?

    (Austria)

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