THE MUSEUM OF THE CONFEDERACY – NOT ENTIRELY GONE WITH THE WIND

Kevin Eagan - Apr 19, 2010
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The American Civil War ended 145 years ago and it still remains one of the most fascinating and researched event of U.S. history. The South still commemorates its dead and lures tourists to visit their Museum of the Confederacy.

 

The pride of the American South still survives. Even though the American Civil War concluded with the capitulation of General Lee in 1865, locals still proudly think of the thousands of dead soldiers, the old way of life, so very different from the Northern states. Today, the former capital of the Confederacy, Richmond, welcomes tourists and history enthusiast who wish to experience first-hand the atmosphere.

They are drawn to the Museum of the Confederacy, which houses the richest collection of artifacts and manuscripts from the former South. The museum serves many purposes. It has become a respected center for study and interpretation of the Civil War and the Confederacy, and features an extensive collection of objects which recall the once glamorous Southern past.

When the Civil War broke out in 1861, Richmond became the capital and President Jefferson Davis needed an official residence. A lavish mansion was selected, where the President lived with his family and where all the major decisions were passed. Locals are very much proud of how meticulously he fought against the much better equipped North and one of the most celebrated facts is that Richmond was never captured. For more than a century, his former home serves as the Museum of the Confederacy.

A visit to the three-storey museum is well worth the time. Apart from an impressive collection of photographs and manuscripts, visitors may admire Robert E. Lee’ field tent, “Stonewall” Jackson’s forage cap, and many other fascinating pieces. However, the museum also shows the daily life of common soldiers, introduces the Confederate Navy and explores the art and society of 19th century America, often by means of lectures and special events.

Showing respect and remembering the old values is clearly a point of pride for the American South. While the former differences are gradually disappearing, the Civil War and its heroes will never be forgotten.

 

Related:

BIGGEST & SMALLEST: MUSEUM OF RECORDS AND CURIOSITIES

MUNDANEUM: INTERNET’S FIRST PREDECESSOR IN BELGIAN MUSEUM

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