KIMBERLEY – AUSTRALIA’S HIDDEN CHARM

Tourism Review News Desk - Jun 12, 2007
0

Australia is one of the most diverse countries in the world. It is very unique especially thanks to many of its natural treasures and striking scenery, unusual flora and fauna or the culture of the aborigines. It has been attracting tourists for decades now, though as it is a vast country, many regions still remain unexplored. Kimberley, in the north-eastern part of the state of Western Australia, is a remote and largely untravelled destination well worth visiting.

 

The best way to start exploring the area is from Broome. The city was established in 1880, when abundant pearl-oyster beds were discovered off the coast. Its beaches count as one of the most amazing ones in all Australia.

 

The most suitable way of learning about the region is taking the Gibb River Road. It runs from Derby to Wyndham and is a very popular tourist route nowadays and it takes about three to four days to travel its entire length. Tourists should be aware of the fact that the road is closed during the monsoon season.

 

Just outside Derby, the interesting sights begin to appear. Many of local famous bottle-like boab trees are to be seen by the road. The most popular one is the hollow Prison Tree, its estimated to be more than 1,000 years old and has a trunk whose circumference is 14 metres.

 

There are many natural parks on the way, including the marvelous Drysdale River National Park, which can only be reached by walking trails.

 

One of the best known spots on the route is the El Questo Wilderness Park, attracting tourists with its spectacular gorges and hot springs. The Mitchell Falls are a unique spectacle not to be missed by any tourists who visit Kimberley as they are one of the most photographed attractions of this marvelous region.

 

Once in Kimberley, the adventurers should not miss out on Baramudi fishing; it is a rather tricky kind of fish and may demand a higher level of skill. On the other hand, anyone would appreciate the fun of learning how to catch these big and unusual predators.

Comments

Add Comment